Primary Menu

Michael Waite & Jessie In The Morning

5:30am - 10:00am

ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 30: Tourists visit the ancient Acropolis hill, with the ruins of the fifth century BC Parthenon temple on June 30, 2015 in Athens, Greece. Greek voters will decide in a referendum next Sunday on whether their government should accept an economic reform package put forth by Greece's creditors. Greece has imposed capital controls with the banks being closed until the referendum and a daily limit of 60 euros has been placed on cash withdrawals from ATMs. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)

Would you give up your entire salary for unlimited vacation days?

If you’ve answered yes, you and about 550 others agree, according to a survey conducted by the 2019 Vacation Confidence Index by Allianz Global Assistance.

If unlimited vacation time was given, still with a 52 week workload on your shoulders, would you really want the unlimited vacation? The survey suggests that most surveyors would only take as much as 13 days total in order to deal with their workload.

Furthermore, with a term like “unlimited vacation time” the employee would ultimately feel reluctant to leave work.

As 55% of the surveyors answered yes to giving up their entire salary, some companies have begun issuing “endless vacation policies” but in reality it is just another way of saying “work from home” or “work from the beach”. Which, let’s be honest, is that even vacation?

Vacation has nothing to do with work. That’s the point.

 

LinkedIn decided to carry out their own survey asking how many workers on vacation check in to work at some point during. Again, with results from 1000 surveyors, nearly 60% of them admitted to “working” while away on vacation, or at least feeling the pressure to be engaged in their job away from the office.

To take it even one step further, people born between the mid-1990s and the mid-2000s, who are referenced as Generation-Z, were stated as having the hardest time disconnecting from work on vacation time. Approximately 86% of Gen Z workers said they were “actively engaged” with work, according to the LinkedIn survey.

 

With most people checking in to work even while on a limited vacation days supply, it’s hard to say if unlimited vacation days is worth no salary at all.