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Michael Waite & Jessie In The Morning

5:30am - 10:00am

LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 21: Food 4 Less grocery store general clerk Xochil Montenegro hands out a free reusable shopping bag, supplied by the California Grocers Association (CGA) and the City of Los Angeles, to a customer in observance of Earth Day, on the eve of Earth Day, April 21, 2008 in Los Angeles, California. During the two-day program, 50,000 bags are being handed out at about 40 grocery stores to encourage consumers to use reusable bags instead of disposable plastic or paper bags. The use of reusable bag has increased since a statewide plastic bag recycling law was enacted in July 2007 requiring grocers to provide in-store plastic bag recycling and to sell reusable shopping bags. Some communities have banned disposable plastic grocery bags. The free bags provided by the CGA and the city are made of 100% recycled water, soda and food containers. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

Here’s a question for you: Would you consider things like recycling, littering, cutting back on electricity, or wasting water to have a gender identity tied to it?

Apparently, research shows more women care about the environment than men. On top of that, the stereotype suggests environmentally-friendly acts are more feminine than masculine.

When we say environmentally-friendly acts, some examples are purchasing eco-friendly products, going on certain diets, recycling, cutting back on electricity and water usage, and all things that pertain to “going green”.

Studies have shown these sorts of activities and ideologies are seen  more present in women than men. Not to tick men off even more, but it further suggests that this is because of a lack of self-confidence.

Men who are more comfortable with their “manhood” (as they described it) are more likely to join the green movement and start buying the eco-friendly products or losing the plastic bag when grocery shopping.

Either way, at the end of the day, it’s important for everybody to care for our world we live on. How comfortable are you with “going green”?